Mapping the Spread of Ebola: 2014-2015 Maps, Data, Photos, Updates

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This report will not be easy to digest, and it was not meant to be. It is now time to PUT THE FEAR OF GOD into persons who are still ‘playing with fire’ by the continuance of certain behaviors which are known to spread the deadly Ebola virus.

We all know by now the tragic disproportionate number of uninformed, uncaring foolish and reckless people who abound in our world, caring little that their wanton actions may create haphazard life and death situations for others. We learned all about that during the early moments of the 35 year long AIDS epidemic. We also know that many millions of uninformed or just uncaring and / or foolish people happen to live in or near GROUND ZERO regions of the Ebola virus in west Africa. Those persons must now be reached by any and all means – and impressed IMMEDIATELY with the gravity and dire consequences that their possible reckless actions may cause to those close to them, and to others, far far away. Our very inter-connectedness now threatens to spread this evil virus so quickly that public health officials around the world could easily become overwhelmed. Please, please share this post!

I found a very telling and noteworthy piece of information about Ebola in a small obscure graphic. I’d like to share that graphic FIRST in this series of maps and info-graphics. READ what it says about the spread of Ebola via semen:

“Although victims may appear healthy, they are still infectious as long as their blood and secretions contain the virus. Men who have recovered from the disease can still transmit the virus through their semen for up to 7 weeks after recovery.”

 

What this means is that a self-imposed period of total celibacy for at least 7 weeks after recovery from Ebola needs to be MANDATORY for all males who contracted the disease, and then recovered. Otherwise they may be unwittingly spreading the virus via their sexual activity, post-recovery – endangering lives, and risking RENEWED epidemic. This urgently important fact needs to be broadcast globally to avoid a worldwide Ebola pandemic.

As of March 2015 the Ebola medical crisis appears to have peaked somewhat. Some maps show that new cases are in a period of decline. Other maps continue to project a sharp increase in new cases.It is my own opinion that we are not ‘out of the water’ yet by any means As long as reckless casual sex continues to take place between recovering Ebola patients, and questionable sanitation practices continue, the Ebola outbreak could reappear with dire force in Africa. We can’t let that happen. I have posted statistical data below giving us a snapshot of where the Ebola outbreak is at this time. Education is paramount. I’ll return to update this post every 3-4 months until the Ebola outbreak is fully contained. Let’s see how long that takes.

Updated on March 19th 2015

DARPA has made a stunning announcement, one which strains credulity. Researchers from the USA based military think-tank claim to have discovered a way to STOP the spread of not only Ebola, but all contagious diseases. Here’s the link:  http://fusion.net/story/57515/darpa-thinks-it-has-a-solution-to-ebola-and-all-other-infectious-diseases/

Updated by blog author Leigh Waters on 3.18.2015

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The chart below vividly illustrates what can happen when a small outbreak of such a virulent disease like Ebola doesn’t get the massive attention to halt it’s progress very early on. No one in January of 2014 was paying enough attention to what was about to happen concerning the rapid uncontrolled spread of Ebola. Now in October of 2014, health officials are around the world are racing to establish new protocols which can hopefully halt the spread of the disease and avoid a global pandemic.

 

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Cell phone data was used to develop this map of the migration of Ebola from region to region in south Africa:

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RED ALERT for a possible global pandemic of Ebola was first detected in this computer algorithm map [ shown below ] which dates to March 2014 of this year. My advice would be NOT to wait for “official” travel advisories regarding regions of high infection, but to cancel any travel plans to those regions now. Find a way NOT to travel into Ebola infected regions if at all possible. If their computers told them a global pandemic was highly likely 6 months ago – and officials ignored those warnings, then odds are they have drastically under-estimated the possible speed at which this disease could spread, and the possible numbers of people globally who could be affected. Stay home. It’s better to be safe than sorry.

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I’d also like to re-post in it’s entirety another very helpful and informative post about Ebola which is located at http://www.vox.com/2014/10/1/6877617/16-charts-maps-and-photos-that-explain-the-ebola-outbreak

15 charts, maps, and photos that explain the Ebola outbreak

1. Ebola was first discovered in 1976 in Zaire (now known as the Democratic Republic of Congo).

Ebola electron micrograph 1976

An electron micrograph containing the Ebola virus taken in 1976.

2. Between 1976 and 2013, 20 Ebola outbreaks killed a total of 1,548 people.

Previous Ebola outbreak

Previous Ebola Outbreaks by relative size. Joe Posner / Vox.

3. Four strains of Ebola can infect humans. The Zaire strain is the most deadly, and is the disease spreading in this outbreak.

Deadliness of Ebola Strains

The current outbreak is the Zaire ebolavirus. Joss Fong / Vox.

4. Ebola patients have to be kept in isolation wards. One problem is that West Africa lacks enough of them.

isolation.0.jpg

Ibrahim Fambulle, barely able to stand, tries to walk to a different isolation room in an Ebola ward on August 15, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. Photo by John Moore/Getty Images.

5. This is the worst Ebola outbreak ever.

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Ebola deaths by outbreak. Joss Fong/Vox.

6. It’s spread to seven countries and killed 3,091 people – nearly twice as many as all other outbreaks combined.

Ebola deaths, 2014 outbreak

7. Ebola has killed more than 200 health care workers in Africa.

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A Sierra Leonese burial team carries the coffin of Dr Modupeh Cole, Sierra Leone’s second senior physician to die of Ebola. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images.

8. Ebola is also spreading through unsafe burial practices in Africa.

The Tweh farm cemetery in Liberia, where burials have ben halted, September 30, 2014. Pascal Guyot / Getty Images.

The Tweh farm cemetery in Liberia, where burials have ben halted, September 30, 2014. Pascal Guyot / Getty Images.

9. The only way to catch Ebola is to have direct contact with the bodily fluids of someone who has Ebola and has begun showing symptoms.

Ebola flowchart

10. Modern public health systems can stop Ebola. West Africa’s poverty and underfunded health care system allowed it to spread.

Health workforce

11. The CDC projects as many as 1.4 million people could be infected with Ebola by January if the outbreak isn’t stopped.

CDC ebola projection

12. But Nigeria and Senegal stopped their Ebola outbreaks cold.

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Medics carry a Nigerian patient during his transfer to another hospital in Istanbul, Turkey on September 25, 2014. Metin Pala/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images.

13. A Texas hospital diagnosed the first-ever American case of Ebola on September 30.

ebola map

14. The United States has a robust health infrastructure that will near-certainly prevent the disease’s spread.

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15. There is no cure, treatment or vaccine for Ebola.

Ebola vaccine testing

A possible Ebola vaccine called Chimp Adenovirus type 3 being tested in London. Steve Parsons-WPA Pool/Getty Images.

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